Rules of Civility

I was just a kid April 4, 1968, when Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot and killed in my hometown. My family – mom, dad, my younger brother Robert, and my baby sister Monica – were in the dining room finishing dinner when I rushed in from the TV room to announce the news. Both my parents had grown up in the east, in Brooklyn, but they’d lived in the south long enough to know a thing or two about race relations, and were savvy enough about “the times” to understand King’s assassination would be a momentous event, that it might change everything.

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The First Thing We Do, Let’s Kill The Tax Man

tax zombies

Anti-tax zombie Grover Norquist posted a truly incredible tweet on Twitter Monday. Widely-known in the media (and somewhat in the popular consciousness) for his audacious quote, first published in 2001, that he wasn’t so much interested in abolishing government, rather, just wanted to shrink it to where it might be “drowned in a bathtub” – he is arguably the nation’s foremost one-trick pony arguing “tax is theft.”

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A Bridge Too Far

Among the heinous stains left in the fabric of American society by the country’s 43rd President, perhaps the most conclusive of Osama bin Laden’s victory in his war against the West, assuredly the most repulsive and annoying to me personally, is the Department of Homeland Security and its Transportation Security Administration.

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Apocalypse Now

A quick look at the IJHTS Archives reveals the vast majority of this blog’s content is dated between 2001 and 2008. That, of course, was the era of the George W. Bush administration, on whose watch occurred the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the U.S. invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, and the economic devastation wrought by the collapse of American financial institutions between 2007 and 2009.

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